Journal cover Journal topic
E&G Quaternary Science Journal An open-access journal of the German Quaternary Association
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Volume 11, issue 1
E&G Quaternary Sci. J., 11, 148-165, 1960
https://doi.org/10.3285/eg.11.1.15
© Author(s) 1960. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
E&G Quaternary Sci. J., 11, 148-165, 1960
https://doi.org/10.3285/eg.11.1.15
© Author(s) 1960. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  15 Dec 1960

15 Dec 1960

Die Letzte Eiszeit in Nordamerika und Europa

Paul Woldstedt Paul Woldstedt

Abstract. As new observations and C14-determinations, especially in the surrounding of the big inlandices, show, the evolution of the Last Glaciation took place in the same manner in Europe as in North America. A first great ice advance (with minor oscillations) which lasted from about 70 000 to about 50 000 Years B. P., was followed first by a great interstadial (Göttweig, Talbot) and then by a middle part with a changing climatic character, viz. with warmer times („interstadials") and colder ones (with formation of loess etc.). This part lasted from the end of the Göttweig-Interstadial (about 43 000) to about 25 000 Y.B.P. In the third part of the Last Glaciation a new great advance of the ice took place, which led to the maximum extension. Then the ice receded with some minor readvances. About 10 000 Y.B.P. the temperature rose strongly and brought the Last Glaciation to an end (though some big ice relicts still existed). The three parts of the Last Glaciation should be named: Old, Middle and Young Würm (Old, Middle, Young or Lower, Middle, Upper Wisconsin).

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